Last edited by Taubar
Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

2 edition of Renaissance Venice and the terraferma. found in the catalog.

Renaissance Venice and the terraferma.

Denis E. Cosgrove

Renaissance Venice and the terraferma.

by Denis E. Cosgrove

  • 237 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21653566M

Venice During The Renaissance By: Taylor, Sara, Zoe and Josh Pictures Political Aspects of Venice The relative political freedom they afforded was conducive to academic and artistic advancement. The unique political structures of late Middle Ages Italy have led some to theorize. Renaissance Venice is drawn entirely from the Morgan’s own holdings. Splendidly curated and comprising roughly eighty drawings, maps, letters, and books, it covers a great deal of ground while.

  Her first book, Virgins of Venice: Enclosed Lives and Broken Vows in the Renaissance Convent (), explored the experience of nuns during the Counter-Reformation. It was followed by Mission to China: Matteo Ricci and the Jesuit Encounter with the East (). For the depth and acuity of its insights into political, cultural, and private life in fifteenth-century Venice, this book will be essential reading for students of the Renaissance. For the grace and drama of its storytelling, it will be savored by anyone who wishes to look .

Other articles where Terraferma is discussed: Venice: Terraferma: Although Venice may aptly be regarded as an isolated sea city, it has always had close links with the surrounding marshlands and the mainland of northern Italy. The Venetian republic included the perimeter of the lagoon, the dogado, within its territory. In addition, from. History 'Individually, (the essays) present valuable insights into the politics and society of terraferma communities from Verona to Friuli during the period of Venice's mainland expansion. Collectively, they are a healthy corrective to the insularity and exclusivity of so much twentieth-century writing on the history of Venice. essential.


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Renaissance Venice and the terraferma by Denis E. Cosgrove Download PDF EPUB FB2

At the beginning of the sixteenth century, Venice's mainland possessions, called the terraferma, stretched westward from Udine nearly all the way to Milan and included Padua, Vicenza, Verona, Brescia, and Bergamo.

These Venetian strongholds ensured a continuous food supply and safeguarded trading routes to the north. Even though Venice's enemies combined to form the League of Cambrai and. In this important book, Luca Molà examines the silk industry in Renaissance Venice amid changing markets, suppliers, producers, and government regulations.

Drawing on archival research and a vast amount of European scholarship, Molà documents the innovations Venetians made in manufacturing and marketing to spur the silk by: General Overviews.

Although scholars began to record the history of Venice while the Republic still existed, and several multivolume histories appeared during the 19th century, the focus here is on the study of Venice since World War II, and especially in the most recent decades.

Venice emerged from its medieval past in the fifteenth century to become one of the greatest cities in Italy. Venice developed as a city unlike that of any other in Italy. Whereas other cities in the peninsula could say they were founded by the ancient Romans, and thereby claim an ancestry related to Rome, Venice could not.

In this important book, Luca Molà examines the silk industry in Renaissance Venice amid changing markets, suppliers, producers, and government regulations. Drawing on archival research and a vast amount of European scholarship, Molà documents the innovations Venetians made in manufacturing and marketing to spur the silk industry.

Renaissance Venice and the terraferma. book and the Renaissance book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. Pursuing the intersections of Venetian culture from the beginni /5(11).

The Renaissance in Venice book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. The art of the Venetian Renaissance, with its chromatic richness /5(6).

Venice, city, major seaport, and capital of both the province of Venezia and the region of Veneto, northern Italy. An island city, it was once the center of a maritime republic. It was the greatest seaport in late medieval Europe and the continent’s commercial and cultural link to Asia.

Citizens of Vicenza, the first city to come under Venetian rule, proclaimed their city "firstborn of Venice" and a model for the Venetian Republic's dominions on the terraferma.

In Firstborn of Venice James Grubb tests commonplace attributes of the Renaissance state through a rich case study of society and politics in fifteenth-century Vicenza. The field of Venetian studies has experienced a significant expansion in recent years, and the Companion to Venetian History, provides a single volume overview of the most recent developments.

It is organized thematically and covers a range of topics including political culture, economy, religion, gender, art, literature, music, and the environment. Indeed, not only was it a vital sector of the economy of Venice and its Terraferma, but it was also highly flexible, open to innovation, and responsive to the changing tastes of consumers.

The author has organized the book into three sections: the growth of international competition, the Venetian industry, and the mainland state. Just as with Florence, Venice was a Republic during the ly, Venice was an empire that controlled land in what is modern day Italy, a whole lot of sea coast down the Adriatic and countless islands.

It enjoyed a stable political climate and thriving trade economy, both of which survived outbreaks of the Black Death and the fall of Constantinople (a major trading partner).

Get this from a library. Art and life in Renaissance Venice. [Patricia Fortini Brown] -- For courses in Renaissance Art. Through close examination of Renaissance paintings, drawings, book illustrations, and other art works, [the author] brings fourteenth and fifteenth century Venice.

A good study of social history, notably about the lower class of Venice. Note the virtually independent third part of the book about the economic situation of the Jews in the city without and in the terraferma with “Monti di Pietà” in the century after the League of Cambrai ().

Ravid, Benjamin. Studies on the Jews of Venice,   “Renaissance Venice: Drawings From the Morgan” is the museum’s first attempt to showcase the Venetian works from its large collection of Italian drawings.

In this important book, Luca Mola examines the silk industry in Renaissance Venice amid changing markets, suppliers, producers, and government regulations. Drawing on archival research and a vast amount of European scholarship, Mola documents the innovations Venetians made in manufacturing and marketing to spur the silk industry.

In —some fourteen years after Johannes Gutenberg printed a bible using movable type—this transformative technology arrived in Venice, and the city rapidly became Europe's preeminent center for book publishing.

During the last few decades of the fifteenth century, a new kind of volume appeared: the hand-illuminated printed book. Get this from a library. The silk industry of Renaissance Venice. [Luca Molà] -- Annotation The manufacture of luxury textiles, such as silk, was central to an Italian Renaissance economy based on status and conspicuous consumption.

From the rapidly changing fashions that drove. In this important book, Luca Molà examines the silk industry in Renaissance Venice amid changing markets, suppliers, producers, and government regulations.

Drawing on archival research and a vast amount of European scholarship, Molà documents the innovations Venetians made in manufacturing and marketing to spur the silk s: 2.

Terraferma (mainland state) produced some tons of raw silk, being the third. largest producer in Italy after Calabria and Sicily. Chapter ten deals with the uses of this silk. Part of it was indeed used in.

Venice, but most of the silk was exported after being spun (thrown) and after. having paid a duty. Book Description. John Law is concerned here with the administration of the Venetian state in the late 14th and 15th centuries, and specifically with its possessions on the mainland of Italy.

These gave Venice dangerously exposed and lengthy land frontiers, and also included a number of cities whose loyalties were not to be taken for granted.Another key figure in the development of Renaissance architecture in Florence was Leon Battista Alberti (—), an important Humanist theoretician and designer, whose book on architecture De re aedificatoria was the first architectural treatise of the Renaissance.

Alberti designed two of Florence’s best known 15th century buildings.The Republic of Venice fought the War of the Castle of Love against Padua and Treviso in It signed a trade treaty with the Mongol Empire in InPietro Gradenigo sent a fleet of 68 ships to attack a Genoese fleet at Alexandretta, then another fleet of ships was sent to attack the Genoese in