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Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

3 edition of Micropropagation of forest trees through tissue culture found in the catalog.

Micropropagation of forest trees through tissue culture

P. W. Evers

Micropropagation of forest trees through tissue culture

by P. W. Evers

  • 340 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by Pudoc in Wageningen, the Netherlands .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Plant cell culture,
  • Forests and forestry

  • Edition Notes

    StatementP.W. Evers ... [et al.].
    ContributionsRijksinstituut voor Onderzoek in de Bos- en Landschapsbouw De Dorschkamp.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsSD403.5 E84 1988
    The Physical Object
    Pagination84 p :
    Number of Pages84
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22103274M
    ISBN 109022009262

    Recent development of in vitro culture techniques has made it possible to commercially propagate useful trees, both forest and fruit trees. Micropropagation of Woody Trees and Fruits provides comprehensive information on micropropagation of economically important forest and fruit trees, which is usually available in scattered literature. Plant Tissue Culture, Cell Culture or Micropropagation is the technique of forest, and fruit trees by tiny plantlets. Commercialization of these crops has already taken place. In Ornamental crops, Orchids, of agricultural crops is possible through tissue culture method, which.

    Micropropagation, simply put, means producing identical plants by culturing plant tissues or organs under sterile conditions. For mass propagation of forest species, the DBT set up two tissue-culture pilot plants in , one of them being at T ERI's facility at Gual Pahari, Gurgaon.   Highlights The progress in micropropagation of lentisk described here seems promising as a model system for large scale clonal propagation. In vitro culture of lentisk is thus a complementary strategy to existing propagation techniques. Micropropagation protocol given above is an ideal technique for cloning dioecious woody plant, Pistacia lentiscus L., where male trees .

    Additional Physical Format: Online version: Trees. Berlin ; New York: Springer-Verlag, © (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors. application of micropropagation techniques as an alternative mean of asexual propagation of important trees has increased the interest of workers in various fields. The technique of cell and tissue culture, under controlled and defined conditions, has contributed in raising new plants, manipulation of plant without conventional breeding mechanism.


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Micropropagation of forest trees through tissue culture by P. W. Evers Download PDF EPUB FB2

Book: Micropropagation of forest trees through tissue culture. pp pp. ref Abstract: A survey of the work done at the Physiology Department of the Dorschkamp Institute from to Individual chapters cover Alnus glutinosa alnus glutinosa Subject Category: Organism NamesCited by: Micropropagation of forest trees through tissue culture.

Wageningen: Pudoc, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Rijksinstituut voor Onderzoek in de Bos- en Landschapsbouw De Dorschkamp. ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: Prepared by Dorschkamp Research Institute for Forestry.

Abstract. Since the first work on culture of isolated plant cells and tissues in artificial nutrient solutions attempted by Gottlieb Haberlandt () in Graz, Austria, years ago, several practical applications have been derived by combining classical forest tree improvement programmes and tissue culture techniques, in particular for conifers and eucalyptus species, Cited by: 1.

Callus cultures have been established from a wide range of tissue sources for at least 30 species of Eucalyptus. Plant regeneration from callus was successful for 12 of these species.

Micropropagation through axillary proliferation, or adventitious shoot proliferation on nodal explants, or both, has been by:   Tissue culture of forest trees—Clonal propagation of mature trees of Eucalyptus citriodora Hook, by tissue culture.

Plant Sci. Lett. – Article Google ScholarCited by: Among them, micropropagation by tissue culture is considered effective and useful method.

There were several reports on micropropagation of endangered trees (Okochi et al., ; Sugii &. Micropropagation is the practice of rapidly multiplying stock plant material to produce many progeny plants, using modern plant tissue culture methods.

Micropropagation also referred as tissue culture is used to multiply plants such as those that have been genetically modified or bred through conventional plant breeding methods. It is also used to provide a sufficient. A lot of research efforts are being made to develop and refine micropropagation methods and culture media for large-scale plant multiplication of several number of plant species.

However, many forest and fruit tree species still remain recalcitrant to in vitro culture and require highly specific culture conditions for plant growth and development.

Forest Trees. Conifers. ( m2) tissue culture unit. The recurring (energy, labour, media, culture container, transplanting material) and non-recurring (laboratory infrastructure. Micro-propagation is one of the finest ways of plant multiplication by in vitro technique of plant tissue culture.

The newer tissue material obtained through r DNA technology or haploid culture or somatic hybridization can be the source of tissue material for micro-propagation, as it is the easiest method for obtaining the multiple propagules.

Moreover, micropropagation has been successfully done in many trees (Gupta et al. ; Jaiswal and Pratap Narayan, ; Amin and Jaiswal, ; Mascarenhas and Muralidharan, ).

Mascarenhas and Muralidharan () reviewed the tissue culture studies carried out on forest trees in India. Micropropagation is probably the most widely applied tissue culture technique and its direct impact on commercial plant production is considerable (Debergh, ).

Since Morel and Martin obtained virus-free dahlias by meristem culture intissue culture techniques have progressed significantly. This book provides comprehensive information on micropropagation of economically important forest and fruit trees, which is usually available in scattered literature.

Topics cover a wide range, from tropical forest and fruit trees for paper or food. Micropropagation has become a reliable and routine approach for large-scale rapid plant multiplication, which is based on plant cell, tissue and organ culture on well defined tissue culture media under aseptic conditions.

A lot of research efforts are being made to develop and refine micropropagation methods and culture media for large-scale plant. Tissue culture is the in vitro aseptic culture of cells, tissues, organs or whole plant under controlled nutritional and environmental conditions [] often to produce the clones of resultant clones are true-to type of the selected genotype.

The controlled conditions provide the culture an environment conducive for their growth and multiplication. A lot of research efforts are being made to develop and refine micropropagation methods and culture media for large-scale plant multiplication of several number of plant species.

However, many forest and fruit tree species still remain recalcitrant to in vitro culture and require highly specific culture conditions for plant growth and : Hardcover. plantain, potato, sugarcane, sweet potato, yams, ornamentals, fruit and forest trees.

The main advantage of tissue culture technology lies in the production of high quality and uniform planting material that can be multiplied on a year-round basis under disease-free conditions anywhere irrespective of the season and weather.

The need for appropriate in vitro plant regeneration methods for woody plants, including both forest and fruit trees, is still overwhelming in order to overcome problems facing micropropagation such as somaclonal variation, recalcitrant rooting, hyperhydricity, polyphenols, loss of material during hardening and quality of plant material.

The basic setup for plant propagation, through tissue culture, can be easily created in your own kitchen at home. With basic knowledge of plant tissue culture techniques, there's no need to purchase plants ever again. Transfer new shoots to a greenhouse, before replanting them in the garden, to prepare the plants for life outdoors.

For example forest trees like the eucalyptus, teak and fruit trees like cashew, coconut etc. never breed true to type. Methods of tissue culture are now available for rapidly multiplying “elite” teak and eucalyptus trees, growing in the forests of chandrapur and Tamil Nadu respectively. Forest trees are renewable sources of food, fodder, fuel wood, timber and other valuable non-timber products.

The ever increasing human and livestock populations have put heavy demands for plant products, resulting in over exploitation of forest trees. Therefore, there is an urgent need for conservation of germplasm and also for propagation of a sustainable utilization of forest trees.Plant Tissue Culture Terminology AdventitiousDeveloping from unusual points of origin, such as shoot or root tissues, from callus or embryos, from sources other than zygotes.

Agara polysaccharide powder derived from algae used to gel a medium. Agar is generally used at a concentration of g/liter.Plant Tissue Culture. InFrench botanist George Morel was attempting to obtain a virus-free orchid plant when he discovered that a millimetre-long shoot could be developed into complete plantlets by micropropagation.

This was the beginning of tissue culture.